Treat plywood? (after near disaster)

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Treat plywood? (after near disaster)

Postby stubbsz » December 31st, 2005, 7:16 pm

My External Pump died today so, I had a great opportunity to clean out the sump and the protein skimmer while waiting for a new one.

Lucky for me that this happened I think because it alerted me to a slow leak that I hadn't noticed from my ETS skimmer that had soaked the crappy particle board(more like paper board) under my sump. The sump was supporting itself only on the edges and not on the entire bottom surface. This is a nice sized lifereef sump holding maybe fifteengallons when the tank is running. I can't believe it hadn't broken through the board or cracked. Well made sump I guess.

I had some 1/2 inch oak ply (left over from my never ending canopy project ) that I am cutting to size. Do I need to Treat the Ply board with anything to resist water? If I do, then what to treat it with?

-Adrian
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Postby knucklehead » January 2nd, 2006, 2:10 am

Probably the best thing you could do with it is paint it, or coat it with epoxy.

The most important part to seal with the paint or epoxy is the edges.

Hope that helps...
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Postby stubbsz » January 2nd, 2006, 11:49 am

Thanks for the advice... I will probably go for both of those.
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Postby FragMaster » January 2nd, 2006, 3:33 pm

Slap some spar on it. Actualy Iwould paint the entire interior of the stand if it were me. you know how you get those drips of water and various splashes? They have to end up some where! LOL!!!!
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Postby stubbsz » January 2nd, 2006, 3:47 pm

Spar is a vanish? Any reason, one varnish, wood protector would be better than another?
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Postby knucklehead » January 2nd, 2006, 4:31 pm

All you need to do is seal the plywood, any varnish or paint or epoxy would do

Since you aren't going to be looking at it all the time use anything you have.

it would be a waste to use spar varnish, its rather expensive compared to some of the other crap you could buy.

A protector like tompsons water seal will protect it, but it won't keep water from seeping in between the layers of plywood and delaminating them, so you want to use something a bit thicker to seal the edges.
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Postby FragMaster » January 2nd, 2006, 6:11 pm

I use it on every thing.
It is much thicker than average and covers very well.
I guess It is just a favorite of mine to use.
I get it fairly cheap here in ohio though? I bought a gallon of it for $30.00 last year and needless to say I have alot left over! LOL!!
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Postby stubbsz » January 2nd, 2006, 7:27 pm

Thanks guys, I used some "preserva-wood" that I had in the garage.

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Postby FragMaster » January 2nd, 2006, 9:56 pm

Sweet! as long as it coats and seals your good to go.
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Postby cwa46 » January 4th, 2006, 6:30 pm

Do you know they now make wood foundations that have a life span of 50-100 years. They are made from 3/4" treated plywood and treated lumber. Not a drop of sealer or varnish. You can't eliminate the moisture, so the wood treatment stops mold and mildew from occuring.
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Postby knucklehead » January 4th, 2006, 7:32 pm

cwa46 wrote:Do you know they now make wood foundations that have a life span of 50-100 years. They are made from 3/4" treated plywood and treated lumber. Not a drop of sealer or varnish. You can't eliminate the moisture, so the wood treatment stops mold and mildew from occuring.



What is this plywood treated with?

You aren't talking about Pressure treated plywood are you?

That is on its way to being outlawed around here, and is never to be used indoors under any circumstances....
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Postby cwa46 » January 4th, 2006, 9:01 pm

knucklehead wrote:
cwa46 wrote:Do you know they now make wood foundations that have a life span of 50-100 years. They are made from 3/4" treated plywood and treated lumber. Not a drop of sealer or varnish. You can't eliminate the moisture, so the wood treatment stops mold and mildew from occuring.



What is this plywood treated with?

You aren't talking about Pressure treated plywood are you?

That is on its way to being outlawed around here, and is never to be used indoors under any circumstances....
Well its apparently isn't the same stuff!

Take a look.. http://www.southernpine.com/pwf.shtml
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Postby knucklehead » January 4th, 2006, 9:17 pm

Yeah, this is the one I was talking about...

Chromated Copper Arsenate (CCA)

Its still sold everywhere, apparently so far all they have done is change the labeling so that they are not liable if you use it somewhere its not supposed to be.
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Postby knucklehead » January 4th, 2006, 9:19 pm

Here is an interesting blurb....


Wood is one of the most economical and versatile construction materials used in the marine environment, and pressure-treated Southern Pine continues to be preferred for use in a long list of marine applications. Marine designers, contractors and specifiers favor treated wood because it is readily available, easily repairable, and extremely durable. When it comes to floating docks and piers, wood decks are lighter, requiring less flotation. Environmentally conscious marina developers also point to the fact that wood is renewable and requires much less energy to produce than steel, aluminum, or concrete.

To assure long-lasting service in demanding marine environments, pressure treatment with preservatives is the most effective method of protecting wood. Southern Pine is the most treatable of all softwood species. Its unique cellular structure permits deep, uniform penetration of preservatives.

For most marine construction, waterborne preservatives are preferred. These treatments are clean, colorless and odorless. Leading waterborne preservatives approved for outdoor applications in the market today include Alkaline Copper Quat (ACQ), Copper Azole (CA) and Chromated Copper Arsenate (CCA).

Recent labeling changes mandated by the Environmental Protection Agency have removed CCA as a preservative of lumber products intended for general consumer use. ACQ and CA are replacing CCA in the outdoor consumer market, generally for the preservation of common lumber of one- to two-inches in thickness or small sawn posts, usually less than 5x5". Sold under a variety of trade names, ACQ and CA contain no arsenical or chromium compounds and provide the same resistance to decay and termite attack.

CCA Treatment Still EPA Approved for Saltwater Use

While ACQ and CA are effective in ground contact or freshwater applications, CCA still has an important role to play in harsh marine environments where wood is either immersed in saltwater (including brackish) or exposed to saltwater splash. That is why the EPA continues to approve the use of CCA for marine construction, as specified in the American Wood Preserver's Association Use Category Standard UC5 and Commodity Standard C18. Properly specified and installed, CCA-treated Southern Pine rejects destructive marine fungi and borers - the chemical treatment makes the wood an undesirable food source for these organisms. See a list of products that may continue to be treated with CCA here.

Marine specifiers will continue to select CCA treatment for structural components exposed to saltwater, such as round piles, sawn timbers and heavy dimension lumber used for cross bracing, pile caps and stringers. But with broad introduction of "environmentally friendly" ACQ and CA into the market, there are now alternatives to CCA for surface decking, railing and other components not exposed to salt water. Specifiers may now select economical ACA- or CA-treated Southern Pine decking as the "environmentally friendly" choice over costly and nonrenewable petrochemical-based composites.
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Postby minibowmatt » January 5th, 2006, 9:15 am

what size is the piece of ply? I would buy a spray can of Spar Varnish, and coat the He** out of it. A can will run ya $10, and will do the best job. Be aware, spar varnishes generally yellow over time. (probably not an issue cause it is under your sump.
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Postby cwa46 » January 6th, 2006, 4:13 pm

Go buy a sheet of 1/2" tile backerboard. Screw it down and forget it, because it is water proof! Less expesive than the sealer for your wood!
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Postby SnowManSnow » January 9th, 2006, 5:31 pm

here's what I do

1st mix up a bag of sacreet.... then take the plywood and let it soak for a few mins.

Set it in the sun and let dry.
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Re: Treat plywood? (after near disaster)

Postby stephenpeter4 » October 27th, 2010, 2:40 am

Treating timber provides long-term resistance to organisms that cause deterioration. If it is applied correctly, it extends the productive life of timber by five to ten times.

Treated Pine Timbers
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